Mike Brown, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Jeremey Lake, John Crawford, Tamir Rice et al.

The United States of America has a history of racism and violence against people of color.

The United States of America does not like to acknowledge these abhorrent actions as a matter of principle and as a result, it can lead to terrific miscarriages of justice.  Mike Brown, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Jeremey Lake, John Crawford and Tamir Rice are just the latest names to add to an ever growing list of individuals that will probably never get justice because of the color of their skin.

It is a terrible shame that the United States has not been able to mature properly enough to void or nullify the systematic racism and violence against people of color, that started so humbly against other savages.  Truth be told, the United States hasn’t even made a sustained genuine attempt at even slowing down a genocidal policy that it has clung to since infancy.  I am discounting the notion of the period known as Reconstruction and the entire Civil Rights movement on the basis that the right to live, outright, trumps any other social or political gain.

Look no further than the Native American if you would like to see how this scenario plays out if left unchecked.

Yes, I’m talking about straight up killing.  In the United States police -and even Florida neighborhood watchmen, are killing unarmed black people with perceived impunity.  Perhaps the murderer of Jeremey Lake will receive some measure of punishment but I believe it is because Officer Shannon Kepler was too egregious and he failed the plausible deniability test -which is really saying something in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  However, wherever possible, it seems that the United States has a knack for alleviating the pressure on those accused of heinous crimes against people of color.

Perception is reality.  Now all of those people of color are dead.  All of the grand juries and smear campaigns against the deceased are now regular tactics that distract from the bottom line; this also helps in collectively and willfully ignoring the racism that perpetuates the violence.  (This is the same root cause that people of color have been obligated to protest against or otherwise cope with, when encountering so called “white people.”  Much more on that later.) The net result is loss of life and that becomes the starting point from which the United States begins to entertain the idea that it must deal with racist and violent past in order to truly become civilized.

The Guardian coverage on Eric Garner was something that told me that the United States might not ever get to that point.  I mean, you can kill a black man on video with your bare hands in New York now and it might not ever make it to trial.  You can shoot an unarmed black man six times in Ferguson for jaywalking from your car and not worry about working again because you can live off of the interview money.

A twelve-year-old playing with a BB gun in the park was killed by police in Cleveland but he should have known better already.  The world already found out that police can still shoot black people shopping in Ohio because they happened to pick up one of the toy guns in the store.  There is just too much murder of unarmed people of color by police to really believe that the United States of America has any interest in that type of civility.  What else can be gleaned from history or either from recent events?

While I acknowledge that we are talking about a worldwide problem of racism that has spanned many generations, the United States of America has some serious work to do right now.

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One Response to “Mike Brown, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Jeremey Lake, John Crawford, Tamir Rice et al.”

  1. George Stinney Knew Injustice | The Chronicles of Six Says:

    […] and they killed him.  The United States of America has been at this sort of thing for years and so we add this to the shit that we already know.  The system is still doing exactly what it was designed to […]

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